Carmentalia (Nova Roma)

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Caeremonia Carmentalis

Da mihi hasce opes, quas peto, quas precor porrige opitula

"Grant me the strength, Goddess, to whom I ask, to whom I pray; extend your assistance to me."

Livius Andronicus, from Equos Troianos

See also Ritus Carmentis, the monthly ritual for Carmentis.

Contents

Introduction

Rites were performed to Carmentis (Carmenta, Carmena) in her sacred grove beneath the Capitoline on the Carmentalia. These festivals occurred on two dates, 11 and 13 January.

The cultus of Carmentis was very ancient; legend claimed that it even predated the founding of Rome. Thus the ceremony had certain features that were unlike other Roman rites. Participants are to enter her grove barefoot, as no leather is permitted in a templum dedicated to Carmentis. No immolationes (blood sacrifices) are to be performed for Carmentis. Milk, rather than wine, is poured as a libation for Carmentis. She may also be offered water with which to wash, olive oil, salt, honey, course meal, and flowers. Soothing herbs, especially those associated with Roman practices of childbirth and breast-feeding, would also be appropriate offerings – rue, malva, and salvia. In the ritual suggested below She is also offered a special dish of cheese and herbs, called popana.

Carmentis is a presence, a Voice, and, being a very early Roman goddess, like Vesta she is not generally represented by an image. A post of cypress-wood, draped in cloth, might be used to represent Carmentis, as is present in the rite below, since this sort of simple object was sometimes used to represent other goddesses. Otherwise by a living tree can represent Carmentis, recalling Her sacred grove. As with other early Roman deities, and especially with terrestrial deities like Carmentis, her rites are to be performed out of doors. The Flamen Cermentalis performs his portion of the caeremonia in ritus Romanus. That is, he wears a toga virilis in Gabian fashion and veils his head. Recalling myths of Carmentis as the wife of Oebalus and mother of Arcadian Evander, the matrons and other celebrants may perform their portions of the caeremonia in ritus Graecus, unveiled and wearing wreaths.

Roman ritual must be performed in a specially sanctified space, called a templum. Prior to performing a formal ritual, therefore, a preliminary ritual is performed to "erect" the templum by taking the auspices. This rite is performed by the Praeses who will be the main celebrant of the caeremonia and the rite is part of his spiritual preparation to conduct the caeremonia Carmentalis. He may also perform a piaculum sacrifice on the day prior to performing the ritual to Carmentis. A piaculum is performed to ask the Gods in advance to forgive any errors that are made during the performance of the followingritual. The Minister sacrificii, who acts as the main assistant to the Praeses, performs the physical preparation of the templum for the caeremonia Carmentalis, leaving the Flamen then to make other preparations.

The ritual suggested below is a modern reconstruction. It is a formal ritual, developed into separate segments after the manner that ancient Romans performed public rites. The ceremony thus refers to a number of participants as might have celebrated a caeremonia for Carmentis. For the private practitioner, the sacrificatio alone might be performed. For a formal ritual the main celebrants may include the following celebrants. A Praeses, represented here by the Flamen Carmentalis, who is the main celebrant directing the ritual. The Minister Sacrificii assists the Praeses during the ceremony by ordering the rites as they proceed. His main function is to make all the necessary preparations prior to the ceremony. This includes preparing and decorating the area (templum), erecting altars, organizing the pompa, and overseeing the offerings. The Praeco, or Herald, directs those observing the rites. A Camillus or Camilli bear the offerings that will be sacrificed by the Praeses. A Tibicen, or flute player, plays in the background throughout the rites. An Augur observes for any signs that might vitiate the rite. Either Augures or Pontifices oversee that all the offerings are proper and that the rite is conducted in a proper manner. A Pontifex acts as Promptor who reads out the proper prayers for the Praeses to recite. Three Vestales Virgines act as witnesses to the rite and also care to see that the templum remains purified.


I. Pompa

A pompa is ordered into sections by the Minister Sacrificii, who will direct when each section is to proceed. Within each section, participants are ordered by rank. First come youths of military age bearing sacred boughs and banners. These are followed by young children bearing flowers and by Vestales Virgines who asperse the area with pure water. Older children follow who incense the area. Dancers, followed by musicians, come next in companies. Men with censers proceed those bearing offerings, followed by those bearing images of the Gods. The Camillus follows alone, bearing the acerra of incense. The Flamen then leads his attending sacerdotes, a company of matrons, and others, each group arranged in order. The pompa, led by the Praeco, enters the sacred grove. It winds three times around the altars, aspersing the grove with pure water drawn from Carmentis’ sacred spring, and incensing the place, as the choir of children sing the praises of Carmentis. With each circuit the pompa has moved into a wider arc, covering the area from the altars at the center of the templum outward. The Flamen meanwhile has led the celebrant near the rear of the pompa. As he enters the templum he and his company of sacerdotes move on an inner circuit around the altars, circling them once. He halts before the altars facing towards the east.

The Praeco steps forward and raps his staff on the ground three times, and with his right hand raised in the sign of soliciting attention, then makes the first call for silentium.

Hoc agete! (Give your attention to this!)
Procul hinc, moneo, procul hinc, quaecumque profanae, ferte gradus nec vos casto miscete labori (Away from here, I warn you, go far away from hence, whosoever among you is unchaste, do not share in this sacred task.) [1]


The Flamen and his attending sacerdotes next step forward. He raises his right hand in the sign of soliciting attention.

Adeste dique hominesque sacris. (Come, be present, Gods and men, to these holy rites.)
Ite procul, sacer est locus, te profani (Go! Far from here, this is a sacred place, Go, you who are profane!)

Flamen: turning to the Minister Sacrificii,

NN, te mihi in sacro esse volo (<Name>, I wish you to be (an assistant) to me in this sacred rite.)

Minister sacrificii: responds,

Audivi (Thus I have heard.)[2]


The Minister then takes charge of the pompa and it proceeds as described above.


II. Praefatio

Flamen: to the Minister sacrificii,

Ei accerse hostias, victumas, lanios, ut ego (huic) sacrificem Magna Matre.

Go! And bring back offerings, sacrifices, and priests to oversee them that I may sacrifice this day to Magna Mater. (After Plautus Pseudolus 326-27:)

Three altars have previously been set up. One, a round altar, is intended for Vesta and the Lares. A second, square altar is also provided in order to call the celestial Gods as witnesses to the ceremony. The third altar is that prepared for Carmentis, and this altar is also round in form. The Minister and his assistants go to each altar in turn, preparing them by first aspersing the area around the altars with pure water as he or she circles them three times. Next he winds woolen threads as februa around each altar three times. This signifies that the altars have been purified The Minister then builds up a stack of firewood in a round form inside the round altars and a molucum in a square form atop the square altar. The Praeco calls for silentium a second time as the Minister returns to the Flamen.

Praeco:

Ite procul, sacer est locus, te profani

Go! Far from here, this is a sacred place, Go, you who are profane! (Calpurnius Bucolia 2.54)

Those observing the ritual respond:

Tacemus. Dis sumus fretus, deos sperabimus

We are silent. We trust in the Gods, we will put our hopes in the Gods (Plaut. Casina 346)

Flamen: to the Minister sacrificii,

Dicito, si silentium esse videbitur

Tell me now, whether it appears to be silentium.

Minister: responds,

Silentium esse videri

It appears to be silentium. (Cicero Div. 2.34.71-2)

The Praeco calls for silentium a third and final time.

Praeco:

Adeste dique hominesque sacris. Procul hinc, procul ite nocentes si cui corde nefas tacitum fessique senectus longa patris, si quis pulsatae conscius umquam matris et inferna rigidum timet Aeacon urna: insontes castosque voco.

Come, be present, Gods and men, to these holy rites. Begone, you wicked folk, begone far from here, all in whose hearts is haboured unspoken an unholy desire, any who thinks their elderly relatives have lived too long, or you who are conscious of ever having struck your own mother, fear the urn of unbending Aeacus in the Underworld. I call only upon the innocent and the chaste. (Statius Silvae 3.3.12-17)

The Flamen approaches the altar, accompanied by two camilli. One camillus holds a bowl, over which the Flamen places his hands. The second camillus pours water three times from a ewer over the hands of the Flamen. The Flamen, while washing his hands, three times raises his right hand above his head so that water may drip upon her. He does this while saying three times:

Haec aqua a corpore impuritates eluat, ut pluvial aera purgat

May this water cleanse my body of impurities, as the rain cleanses the air.

Ritus Vestae

Approaching the round altar of Vestar, bearing gifts in his left hand, and with his right hand held forward, palm up, in a gesture of offering, the Flamen stops short of the altar by two to three steps. Then he prays with his right hand manus supina directed towards the altar.

Vesta mater, cuius castissimas sacerdotes defendi si sacris tuis castas semper admovi manus, effice. Vesta,, te appello, age adsta, mane, audi; tibi me ac meos commendavi.

Mother Vesta, whose most chaste Vestals I have defended, if I have always brought pure hands to Your services, make it so now. O Vesta, , on You I call, come, stand by me, stay, and listen to my pleas, in Your hands I place myself and mine.

Placing paper in the focus of the altar of Vesta, the Flamen prays and lights the fire.

Hus ades, Vesta, tuere caput quos sancta fovet ille manu, bene vivitis, ignes: vivite inexstincti, flammaque duxque, precor. Vesta, fave: tibi nunc operata resolvimus ora, ad tua si nobis sacra venire licet.

Come, be present Vesta, watch over him whose hand tends the Holy Flame. Live well, fires. O live, I pray, undying flames. Vesta favor me. To You now our voices lift in praise as by this rite it is allowed that we may approach You.

He offers bay laurel.

Vesta Mater, te hoc turem obmoveo bonas preces precor, ut sis volens propitius nobis liberisque notris domis familisque nostris.

Mother Vesta, I make this offering of incense to You and pray with good prayers that You will look kindly and favorably upon our children and upon us, on our homes and on our households.

He pours a libation of honeyed milk:

Vesta, macte ista libatione pollicenda sint, macte lacti inferio sint.

Vesta, may You be strengthened by this libation, may You be honored by this small portion of milk.

He offer cakes drizzled with honey.

In tua, Mater carissime, in tua sumus custodia. Vesta. te hoc libum obmovendo bonas preces precor uti sis volens propitius nobis liberisque nostri domis familisque nostri mactus hoc ferto.

In You, dearest Mother, in Your hands we place our safekeeping. Vesta, in offering to You this libum I pray good prayers in order that, pleased with this gift, You may be favorable towards our children and to us, towards our homes and our households.

Vesta mater, ades, quosque pium est adhibere deos, advertite cuncti: auspicibus vobis hoc mihi surgat opus. longa sit Roma aetas dominaeque potentia terrae, / sitque sub hac oriens occiduusque dies.'

Mother Vesta, and all gods who it is pious to summon, join together to attend. Grant that my work may rise with Your auspices. Grant that for many years Rome may hold dominion on earth, and assert its power over the east and west.

Ritus Manibus

In a similar fashion as he performed to Vesta, the Flamen first invokes the Lares to bear witness to the caeremonia.

Audite, Lares, vosque terrestes vosque inferni, audite. Nunc, Lares, vos contestor.

Hear me, Lares, You upon the earth, and You below, listen. I call You to be my witnesses (After Anthologia Latina II 1029.5)

He offers bay laurel. Unlike when offering to Vesta or to the celestial Gods, he uses his left hand when presenting offerings to the Lares.

Lares,vose hoc turem obmoveo bonas preces precor, ut sitis volens propitius nobis liberisque notris domis familisque nostris.

Lares, I make this offering of incense to You and pray with good prayers that You will look kindly and favorably upon our children and upon us, on our homes and on our households.

He pours a libation of honeyed milk using his left hand as his right hand is held manus prona over the focus:

Harumce rerum ergo sitis volens propitius nobis liberisque notris domis familisque nostris, sicuti dixi, ergo macte lacti esto

Thus for these reasons, as I have said, that You might be favorable to us, to our children, our house and our home, therefore may You be honored by this portion of milk.


III. Invocatio

The Flamen Carmentalis next will call upon the celestial Gods to bear witness to the ceremony. He does so by first ritually washing as above, and then lights the focus of the altar prepared for Them by withdrawing a flame from the Altar of Vesta.

Ritus Iani

The Flamen approaches the altar bearing gifts in his left hand and with his right hand held forward, palm up, in a gesture of offering as he carries a flame from the Altar of Vesta. He hands the bowl bearing the flame to one of his camilli and next places paper (on which prayers may be written) into the molucum before lighting the focus. He begins his invocation of the celestial Gods by first addressing Janus.

Hus ades, Pater Iane, Codievi oborieso. Omnia vero ad Patulcium commisse. Iane iam es, duonus Cerus es, duonus Ianus. Veni potissimum melios eum recum, Deorum Deus.

Come, be present, Father Janus, the Opener. Arise Planter (of the Stars). All things, truly, I entrust to Patulcium the Opener. Now You are Janus the Gatekeeper, now Cerus the Good Creator, now Janus the God of Good Beginnings. Come, now most especially, God of Gods, You who are the better of these kings.

He offers incense of bay laurel and sweet scented flowers.

Quamvis aliorum numina placem, Iane, tibi primum tura merumque fero, ut posso aditum per tu, qui limina serves, ad quoscumque volo habere deos.

Janus, though I propitiate other Gods, I do offer wine and cakes to You first, so that I may obtain access through You, Janus, to any of the other Gods I may call upon.

Iane pater testem te testor mihi. Te hoc turem obmoveo bonas preces precor, ut sis volens propitius nobis liberisque notris domis familisque nostris Illaec advorsum si quid pecasso, Deus, veneror te ut miserus ego esse.

Father Janus, I call on You to witness. I make this offering of incense to you and pray that you will look kindly and favorably upon us and our children, on our house and our household. And if I do anything to violate this (rite), I pray that I shall suffer misfortune. (After Plautus Rudens 1338-49)

He pours a libation of honeyed wine:

Iane pater, uti te libue commovenda bonas preces bene precatus sum, eiusdem rei ergo macte vino inferio esto

Father Janus, be strengthened by this bread, be warmed by this small portion of our wine.

Iane, veni: Matutine pater, seu Jane, libentius audis, / unde homines operum primos vitaeque labores / instituunt, sic dis placitum, tu caminis esto / principium.

Janus, come! Father Matutinus, or else Janus, if You so prefer to hear, regarded by men as the beginning of works and life’s labors, so does it please the Gods, may You begin my prayer.

In like manner the Flamen calls upon the celestial Gods as witnesses and offers Them sacrifice.

Audi, Iuppiter, audite Di Deaeque omnes caelestes, vosque terrestes vosque inferni, audite; ego vos testor.

Hear me, Jupiter. Listen all You Heavenly Gods and Goddesses, and You Gods of the earth, and You below, listen. I call You to be my witnesses (After Plautus Bacchides 892-95)

He offers bay laurel.

Di immortales, vos hoc turem obmoveo bonas preces precor, ut sitis volens propitius nobis liberisque notris domis familisque nostris.

Immortal Gods, I make this offering of incense to You and pray with good prayers that You will look kindly and favorably upon our children and upon us, on our homes and on our households.

He pours a libation of wine:

Harumce rerum ergo sitis volens propitius nobis liberisque notris domis familisque nostris, sicuti dixi, ergo macte vino inferio esto

Thus for these reasons, as I have said, that You might be favorable to us, to our children, our house and our home, therefore may You be honored by this portion of wine.


IV. Sacrificatio

The sacrificatio to Carmentis begins in a similar fashion as above. The Flamen Carmentalis again ritually purifies himself before lighting the Altar of Carmentis with a flame drawn from the Altar of Vesta. He then performs an invocatio to call Carmentis to the ceremony held in Her honor.

Invocatio

Hus ades, Carmentis, sorores Porrima Postvortaque te adsint, anima laeta veni, Mater Evanderi.

Come, be present, Carmentis. May Your sisters Porrima and Postvorta attend You. With joyful mind come, Mother of Arcadian Evander.

Carmentis, te hoc turem obmoveo bonas preces precor, ut sis volens propitius nobis liberisque notris domis familisque nostris.

Carmentis, I make this offering of incense to You and pray with good prayers that You will look kindly and favorably upon our children and upon us, on our homes and on our households.

He pours a libation of honeyed milk:

Carmentis, macte ista libatione pollicenda sint, macte lacti inferio sint.

Carmentis, may You be strengthened by this libation, may You be honored by this portion of milk.

Praecatio

The veiled Flamen performs an adoratio, kissing his right hand before placing it upon the altar as he prays.

Mater, te appello, age adsta, mane, audi; iteradum eadem ista mihi dic.

Mother, on You I call, come, stand by me, stay, and listen to my pleas. Speak to me once again, in Your own words, as You did before.

In Your sacred grove nymph Egeria counseled King Numa, bear forth now Your soothing songs to dispel our sorrows.

Come forth! I call to You.

Good Goddess, great Goddess of charms.

Give voice, happy Voice of song,

With soothing songs as will cure our ills, or whatever else we fear.

Spare our daughters heavy with child, spare our wives in their pangs of labor,

Care for the mothers who worry over their children.

With pious rite I call out, I summon; I entice with songs that You come forth, Carmentis

And look favorably upon the matrons of Nova Roma.

The flamen Carmentalis places a wreath of flowers leaning against the altar. Again he makes an adoratio. Cakes of cheese he cuts and piles high. He pours sweet honey over the dainties and then, bending over the offerings, he murmurs an invocation calling the Goddess by Her name. Again he makes an adoratio before serving these cakes one by one into the focus. He then prays manus prona over the focus.

In tua, Mater carissime, in tua sumus custodia. Carmentis. te hoc popanae obmovendo bonas preces precor uti sis volens propitius nobis liberisque nostri domis familisque nostri mactus hoc ferto.

In You, dearest Mother, in Your hands we place our safekeeping. In offering to You this cake of cheese I pray good prayers in order that, pleased with this offering of popana, You may be favorable towards our children and us, towards our homes and our households.

(Note: Popana was a kind of Greek moretum, a mixture of cheese and herbs made into cakes. In later Roman myth Carmentis was identified with Nicostrate, the mother of Evander, and She was also assimilated as Themis, the Greek Goddess of Order, Foundress of Roman civilization, and Mother of Iusticia and Pax. Her identification with a Greek Goddess may have been due to Her rites being performed as ritus Graecus. In spite of the term, such Roman rites were not based on Greek practice, but may instead be another indication of just how old Her cultus really was at Rome. Another Roman cultus that used ritus Graecus was that dedicated to Saturnus who was clearly not a Greek introduction. At any rate, Her identification with Greek Goddesses would seem to warrant offering Her popana after Roman practice under Augustus.)

The Flamen sacrifices other offerings at this point and may also make dedications of implements for the cultus of Carmentis.

Carmentis, te hoc rutulam herbamque obmoveo bonas preces precor, ut sis volens propitius nobis liberisque notris domis familisque nostris.

Carmentis, I make this offering of rue and herbs to You and pray with good prayers that You will look kindly and favorably upon our children and upon us, on our homes and on our households.


Throughout the ceremony the other celebrants may participate in the sacrifices offered by the Flamen by extending their right hand towards the altars in a gesture of liberalitas. During this next portion of the sacrificatio the Flamen signals the Minister sacrificii to allow other celebrants from the pompa to bring offerings forward. Depending on the offerings, these may be placed on a table set for Carmentis or sacrificed in the focus by the Flamen. A period may also be provided to allow others attending the ceremony to approach and make private devotions. This part of the sacrificatio begins with the Minister asking if he may proceed.

Minister sacrificii to the Flamen:

Agone?

Shall I so order (it)?

The Flamen replies:

Agas.

You may do so.

The Minister then gestures towards the matrons to approach the altar. The Camilli take their offerings and presents these to the Flamen, who in turn presents the offerings to Carmentis. The matrons approach, some dressing her image as others mime dressing her hair, and still others holding up mirrors for Carmenis to see. Then while kneeling the matrons pray.

Hail, Carmentis, Goddess of song and prophecy. From your father Sebathus, Telon, king of the Taphonians, took you away from the river shores of Naples to the isle of Capreae, there as Bateia, wife of Oebalus, to become mother to Spartans and Sabines alike. From Campania you set sail with your son Evander up the River Tiber, showing him where to make land, and teaching him the songs by which to found Paletum. In your sacred grove beneath the Palatine Hill you sang as Nicostrate the rites by which Hercules was to honor His Father Jupiter. There, too, you met with Dardanian Aeneas, singing for him the vision of Rome that his generations would found upon the Septimonium. There in your sacred grove you sang to the infant twins as they were nutured by a she-wolf. Next came a Sabine king come, Tatius, a descendent of Oebalus, and after him the son of Pomponius, who established for you a new grove at the foot of Mount Saturnus beneath the Capitolium. There, as Egeria, you sang to Numa Pompilius the rites by which to call upon Mighty Jupiter and the Gods above, and thereby did you give birth to the Pax Deorum.

Accept, O Carmentis, this offering of incense. Cheerfully have your daughters come to adorn your shrine of matrons. Come, most venerable Goddess, appear in flowing robes and nod your assent to the milk that is poured in your honor and the cakes piled high to await you. Bring with you every soothing song to sing; every charm to bring peace and solace. Across the seas, from distant shores, bear with you the words by which we may praise the Gods. O most merciful Mother, we pray for a blessing from Your generous and temperate right hand

Be present, Carmentis, we your chaste daughters pray and bring forth these gifts. We, all the Roman women of noble name, have come barefoot into your sacred grove to veil your venerated image and don it with this mantle. Mother, on you we call, come, stand among us, stay, and listen to our prayers. Speak to us once more, in your own words, as you did before in ancient Rome. Bring forth, Carmentis, your sisters Porrima and Postverta that they too may sing of things that once were and of things that are meant to be. Be our guide, if there is any way, and make your course from the heavens above into this grove as once you dwelt beneath the Capitoline, where rich boughs shade fertile land. Holy Mother, do not desert us in our hour of indecision, but reveal your advice to us once more.

In silence the matrons rise to await the voice of Carmentis as the tibicen plays. If a place has been set up to receive additional offerings, the Minister may then signal other attendees to approach in order to make their private vows and devotions and leave offerings. These additional votives and offerings may be sacrificed or dedicated as appropriate at a later time.

When this portion of the sacrificatio is concluded, the Flamen Carmentalis performs an adoratio, kissing his right hand and touching it to the altar. He pours a libation of honeyed milk. Turning then around, keeping his left hand held liberalitas towards the altar all the while, his right hand is raised manus supina towards the sky, as he prays once more while turning to face each of the cardinal directions.

Mater Carmentis, uti te popanae commovenda bonas preces bene precatus sum, eiusdem rei ergo macte lacti esto

Mother Carmentis, may You be strengthened by these cakes, may You be warmed by this portion of our milk.

The Flamen may then wait, even taking a seat, while looking for any sign that Carmentis has accepted the day’s sacrifices.

V. Litatio

Sacrifices of wine and incense are once more offered to the Gods and Goddesses that were invoked earlier to act as testori. However this is done in reverse order, beginning with Jupiter and the Di immortales, and ending finally with Vesta.

Iovi Disque immortalibus ago gratias merito magnas.

To Jove and to the immortal Gods deservedly do I give great thanks. (Captivi 922; 976-7)

Pour a libation of wine. Then offer incense to Jupiter, to Janus, to the Lares, and to Vesta, each in turn.

Iove pater, te hoc turem obmoveo bonas preces precor, ut sis volens nobis liberisque notris domis familisque nostris Illaec advorsum si quid pecasso, Deus, veneror te ut miserus ego esse.

Father Jupiter, I make this offering of incense to You and pray that You will look kindly and favorably upon us and our children, on our house and our household. And if I do anything to violate this (rite), I pray that I shall suffer misfortune. (Plautus Rudens 1338-49)

Iane pater te hoc turem obmoveo bonas preces precor, ut sis volens propitius nobis liberisque notris domis familisque nostris

Father Janus, I make this offering of incense to You and pray that You will look kindly and favorably upon us and our children, on our house and our household.

Lares,vose hoc turem obmoveo bonas preces precor, ut sitis volens propitius nobis liberisque notris domis familisque nostris.

Lares, I make this offering of incense to You and pray with good prayers that You will look kindly and favorably upon our children and upon us, on our homes and on our households.

Mater Vesta, te hoc turem obmoveo bonas preces precor, ut sis volens propitius nobis liberisque notris domis familisque nostris.

Mother Vesta, I make this offering of incense to You and pray that You will look kindly and favorably upon us and our children, on our house and on our household.

Pour a libation of wine to Vesta.

Mater Vesta, macte istic libatione pollicenda esto, macte vino inferio esto.

Mother Vesta, may you be strengthened by this libation, may You be honored by this portion of wine

The Flamen then turns and steps away from the altar, and with his left hand in a gesture of liberalitas, his right hand raised to the sky manus supina, he says:

Nil amplius vos hodie posco, superi, satis est.

No more, Gods on High, do I ask of You today; it is enough.


VI. Perlitatio

Then turning once more towards the altar, the Flamen stands in silent observance of any signs that the Gods have accepted the offerings. After a moment he signals to your Minister to clean and store the ritual implements while he remains looking for any signs. Then addressing the assembled worshippers the flamen Carmentalis ends the ceremony by saying:

Ilicet. Di deaeque omnes, superi atque inferi, vos semper ament et felicitam volunt.

Thus it is done. May all the Gods and Goddesses above and below always love you and wish you happiness in all that is good.

Vadete in pace Deorum

Go now in the peace of the Gods.

The praeco then leads those observing the rite in response:

Di immortales faciant, tam felix quam pia.

May the immortal Gods make it so, as fortunate as it is pious.

References

  1. Silius Italicus Punica 17.28-29
  2. Cicero Div. 2.34.71-2


Caeremonia Carmentalis

Ab mani M. Moravi Piscini Horatiani

AUC MMDCCLIX

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